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Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory is a business and mindset-focused interview show that will teach anyone aspiring to greatness the secrets to success. The show is hosted by Tom Bilyeu - a serial entrepreneur and co-founder of the #2 Inc. 500 company Quest Nutrition and former host of the viral hit Youtube series Inside Quest (viewed over 100,000,000 times). Bilyeu is known for his passion and preparation. Always eager to truly learn from his guests, Bilyeu digs deep and brings the urgency of someone hungry to put what he’s learning to immediate use - making the show not only entertaining and energetic, but also hyper-useful.
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Now displaying: June, 2020
Jun 30, 2020

The legendary actor Kevin Bacon is one of those rare individuals whose fame seems to have transcended his own name or image. It’s as if he has entered the ether as a meme: “Six Degrees of…” On this episode of Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu, Kevin Bacon discusses the need for connection that underlies the “Six Degrees” meme, and shares the story of a successful career that was built on connection and long-lasting relationships. He also talks about realizing that his strength is in being a character actor, not necessarily a leading man, and describes his process for inhabiting the roles he plays so well.

This episode is brought to you by:

SHOW NOTES:

 

Kevin is quite thankful that he is able to live a very privileged lifestyle [2:16]

Kevin describes life on the road as an actor [5:26]

Absence really can make the heart grow fonder [8:37]

Kevin is completely fine with not being a lead character in a movie [11:45]

Kevin talks about playing a character that is fairly similar to him [14:43]

Marriage is something we put on a pedestal but statistically, it doesn’t usually work [18:06]

Kevin advocates that playing together helps his marriage more than the work they put in [22:09]

Kevin was so hungry to be famous, but he is actually ambivalent about being famous [27:06]

Kevin felt strongly connected to other actors in theater, but not in movies [30:29]

Kevin describes the sense of family in independent films and in theater [35:40]

Kevin discusses the protocol for returning to work during the pandemic [41:47]

Kevin advocates creating your own material even if you aren’t a budding producer [45:04]

Kevin gets asked to play roles that are all over the map [47:47]

Kevin describes his process for inhabiting a role [50:36]

Kevin and Tom discuss what it means to be a producer or a director [54:52]

 

QUOTES:

 

“My theory about the acting thing for me is to use yourself and lose yourself. Because every part that I go into, what else do I have to use but the experiences that I’ve had? But I want to lose myself in the role. I don’t want to feel like it’s Kevin.” [13:09]

 

“It’s really about that hunger that we have for connectivity, as a people, as a nation, as a global entity.” [30:10]

 

FOLLOW:

 

INSTAGRAM: https://bit.ly/2NJKJmt 

FACEBOOK: https://bit.ly/31jAtsN 

TWITTER: https://bit.ly/2CKTo5N 

Jun 26, 2020

Anyone who has been in a long-term relationship knows that you are going to have conflicts; you’re going to have fights. But what are these fights really about? Are arguments about washing the dishes and cleaning the closet really about those issues, or is something deeper happening? On this episode of Women of Impact, Lisa and Tom Bilyeu talk about how to deal with differing values and opposing ideas. They discuss creating shared goals, how they build positive habits, and their methods of making sure that conversations stay open, respectful and honest. And then they give a wonderful example of good communication by examining a real life conflict they have had over making the bed...

SHOW NOTES:

When you are having arguments about money, you are really having conflicts over values [2:48]

Concrete advice on how to minimize financial conflicts [6:59]

When you have a collision of values, part of it is that you are judging each other [9:07]

Why you have to start with shared goals and open discussion of those goals [11:02]

Tom and Lisa discuss corporal punishment, spanking and discipline [14:08]

Tom and Lisa talk about having differing religious beliefs and how they dealt with it [19:50]

What do you do when your habits and routines conflict? [23:47]

How to form habits that help your relationship [27:13]

Whenever you have conflicts over “small issues”, they are actually about deep values [31:10]

The problems that happen when you don’t articulate your values and just project instead [36:47]

 

FOLLOW LISA:

Instagram: https://bit.ly/2TIsoKh

YouTube: https://bit.ly/2IAbTcH

Podcast: https://spoti.fi/2IEajGW

 

FOLLOW TOM:

WEBSITE: impacttheory.com

INSTAGRAM: https://bit.ly/33XrFYV

FACEBOOK: https://bit.ly/2xDM4Xa

TWITTER: https://bit.ly/39slhdy

 

Jun 25, 2020

How does an individual get out of the Matrix? Better yet, how do we as a society escape the Matrix? The extraordinary intellectual Thomas Chatterton Williams has decided to confront one of the most difficult mental prisons that Americans find themselves trapped in--the prison of racism and racial identity. On this episode of Conversations with Tom Bilyeu, Thomas Chatterton Williams tells his own story of unlearning poisonous stories about race through extensive reading, living in a new country, and reflecting on his own family. As the discussion progresses, he confronts the challenges we face in getting past mere anger to build the beautiful society that we ought to be able to live in.

This episode is brought to you by:

Wagner Spray Tech: https://bit.ly/2WNICDs

PeopleReady: Visit peopleready.com/impacttheory

Better Help: Get 10% off your first month at https://betterhelp.com/impacttheory

SHOW NOTES:

 

Thomas talks about a novel that he tried to write that he had to give up on [1:00]

Fiction is a very different medium from non-fiction writing and requires different skills [5:17]

Nothing is ever wasted, and the best of the lost novel ended up in his non-fiction work [9:00]

Thomas credits his father as being the first guy who “pulled himself out of the Matrix” [13:01]

Thomas tells the story of the poet he is named after [18:47]

Thomas then explains how he and his wife chose his daughter’s name [21:20]

Thomas describes how stepping out of America caused him to view race differently [24:26]

Thomas discusses the complexity of his heritage, ethnicity and ancestry [28:52]

Thomas hopes for a society where the skin color is as unimportant as hair color [32:00]

Do people want progress, or do they merely want catharsis and anger? [35:27]

The blanket of identity we throw over every issue obscures deeper problems [41:49]

Tom tells the story of how he started mining for astronauts in poor areas [48:14]

Should we focus on helping children? [56:08]

Children are never in a vacuum and you have to affect the whole family [1:00:55]

Thomas talks about how he and his brother pursued completely opposed paths [1:06:22]

Thomas discusses how he raises his kids [1:13:30]

Thomas defines the good life as autonomy, as living according to his own values [1:19:27]

Tom and Thomas discuss Hip Hop in the 90s and today [1:23:35]

How can we get past anger towards the beautiful society on the other side? [1:32:36]

What happens when people’s efforts are channeled in very limited ways? [1:40:26]

Building desire is one of life’s most important quests [1:52:45]

 

FOLLOW THOMAS:

INSTAGRAM: https://bit.ly/2Z94PvI 

FACEBOOK: https://bit.ly/31dgnAu 

TWITTER: https://bit.ly/3esJJyP 

Jun 23, 2020

Best-selling author Ken Honda might not be famous in America yet. But in Japan, he has helped millions of people change their relationships with money for the better. On this episode of Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu, Ken Honda describes the first steps everyone needs to take to start healing their money wounds, and to transform money from something to be feared into something that brings peace and ease. He also goes into exquisite detail on the tough subject of how to find your gifts, and then how to go about making a living with them.

This episode is brought to you by:

 

 

SHOW NOTES:

 

The Zen approach is to find satisfaction in what you have instead of seeking more [1:20]

Ken’s first lesson about money was to forget about money [2:20]

Ken gives a surprising definition of what wealth means [5:12]

Money doesn't buy happiness, but it really is powerful [7:04]

People are afraid of money because of “money trauma”, often from parents [8:17]

The first step to taking control of your money narrative is gratitude and appreciation [12:15]

Focus on what you can give, and it what you will attract into your life [15:27]

How do you find your gifts, and how do you polish them into something extraordinary? [21:13]

Ken asks people literally a thousand questions to help them find their gifts [24:18]

Ken describes the way that you can monetize your gifts [26:30]

Ken advocates not comparing yourself to other people as a remedy for depression [29:47]

Ken shares the story of his upbringing, where he had money but not peace [32:19]

Ken shares another story of a man who committed family suicide [36:34]

Ken describes how the pain of his father and grandfather fuel him now [39:13]

Friendship is more protective than money [41:22]

Being in a no-money situation is uncomfortable, but it doesn’t kill you [43:49]

Ken describes cultural differences between Japanese and American attitudes [45:53]

Ken talks about what he would do if he lost all his money [50:08]

 

QUOTES:

 

“If you start appreciating everything, including money, your life will be filled with money and appreciation.”  [4:35]

 

“Wealth is an emotion. It doesn’t really matter how much you have or how much you make.” [5:50]

 

“Most of us are not born with only one gift. We are born with several mediocre gifts...so there are many small gifts, but you have to multiply them. And then you become the one and only!” [22:25]

 

FOLLOW:

 

WEBSITE: kenhonda.com

INSTAGRAM: https://bit.ly/2N8Yfjd 

FACEBOOK: https://bit.ly/3ecxDcY 

TWITTER: https://bit.ly/30SWgr4 

Jun 18, 2020

For the last 40 years, Dr. Mahmoud Ghannoum, aka “Dr. Microbiome”, has been one of the leading microbiome researchers. He is also the scientist who named the mycobiome, the body’s fungal community. And on this episode of Health Theory with Tom Bilyeu, Dr. Ghannoum explains the connections between fungi and bacteria in our gut, and why it’s so important for the two communities to work in harmony. He also describes the ways the gut communicates with the brain, discusses current research on autism and gastrointestinal issues, recommends a diet for good gut health, and even shares an incredible story about how one act of kindness can change thousands of lives.

This episode is brought to you by:

Blinkist: Go to https://blinkist.com/impact to start your FREE 7 day trial AND get 25% off a Blinkist Premium Membership.

PeopleReady: Visit peopleready.com/impacttheory

SHOW NOTES:

 

The mycobiome is the fungal community that lives in our body [1:00]

Bacteria and fungi are both good and bad, and are either in harmony or not [2:02]

Tom and Mahmoud use the analogies of forests or gardens to explain how the gut works [3:35]

Mahmoud explains how bacteria and fungi produce benefits by working in harmony [6:01]

The gut communicates with the brain, just as the brain communicates with the gut [9:21]

The microbiome really starts getting formed during birth, through the vaginal canal [12:43]

Biofilms are dangerous because they protect bad microorganisms and prevent nutrition [16:45]

Mahmoud explains how FMT can rebuild the microbiome [19:56]

Mahmoud discusses probiotics and how to target them correctly [23:39]

Mahmoud believes that within five years we will have “probiotics 2.0” [27:32]

Mahmoud explains why he wants to focus on gastrointestinal issues with autistic kids [29:31]

It’s much easier to adjust the fungal community than it is to change bacteria [33:54]

Candida can be very dangerous, but the majority of people have some of it [35:37]

Mahmoud recommends a low sugar, whole foods diet, and describes a good diet [38:18]

Mahmoud shares the story of losing his livelihood due to the invasion of Kuwait [41:22]

One act of kindness can change many lives [45:06]

Dr. Microbiome recommends the one change people should make in their diet [46:36]

 

FOLLOW MAHMOUD:

 

WEBSITE: drmicrobiome.com

INSTAGRAM: https://bit.ly/2URyDM0 

FACEBOOK: https://bit.ly/2Y9vDwk 

Jun 16, 2020

What are the universal principles of leadership? Organizational psychologist and best-selling author Adam Grant is devoted to answering that powerful question. And on this episode of Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu, he lays out the most fundamental aspects of a good leader. Adam and Tom discuss humility, integrity and the importance of being a giver, not a taker. They also delve deep into the idea of “cognitive entrenchment”, which is a deadly trap that everyone has to deal with, no matter how educated, informed, or driven they are.

This episode is brought to you by:

Fully: Take $30 off when you spend a minimum of $300 when you visit fully.com/IMPACTTHEORY

Audible: Get 1 credit to pick any title and 2 Audible Originals from a monthly selection. Visit audible.com/impact or text IMPACT to 500-500

SHOW NOTES:

 

What are the universal principles of leadership? [1:29]

Are you a giver or a taker? [2:42]

Adam explains how to be successful as a giver, and the main traps to avoid [4:31]

If you want to lead, you must keep people’s attention on the message, not on you [6:30]

A leader is like a shepherd, very rarely out in front of the flock [10:03]

Adam describes the skills leaders need to acquire, and the criticism they need to seek [13:12]

Adam explains why he works so hard to avoid getting caught up in being right [17:01]

Teams who have too many superstars don’t win championships [20:53]

The leader of a team is often the person who most exemplifies what the group stands for [24:48]

Adam describes “cognitive entrenchment” where experts get mentally stuck [25:37]

Tom and Adam discuss the need for hyper-specific goals and testable hypotheses [28:47]

Is there a point where the constant need for personal growth actually becomes harmful? [33:33]

Tom talks about being a synthesizer, instead of being the thinker of original thoughts [37:13]

Do you care about what you want to say, or about what people will actually hear? [40:36]

Adam talks about why he doesn’t always follow his intuition [42:04]

 

QUOTES:

 

“People will say, look, you have to practice what you preach. I actually think leaders should be doing the reverse, which is to say, “I am only gonna preach what I already practice.” [3:58]

 

“One of the fundamental mistakes that a lot of leaders make is they develop a style and then they stick to that style. But the whole point of leadership is flexibility and adaptability.”  [11:12]

 

“If people just praise you over and over again, you’re only going to repeat the excellence you’ve already achieved.” [14:10]

 

FOLLOW:

 

WEBSITE: www.adamgrant.net

INSTAGRAM: https://bit.ly/3cVIYMQ 

FACEBOOK: https://bit.ly/2MMhyhU 

TWITTER: https://bit.ly/3dTIjNv 

Jun 12, 2020

 

Daniel Schmachtenberger is best-known as a neurohacker, but some of his most interesting ideas are about civilization--how it thrives, how it fails, and how it eventually collapses. And right now, we are living through times that have many people wondering about the end of the world. On this episode of Conversations with Tom, host Tom Bilyeu and guest Daniel Schmachtenberger engage in a fascinating discussion about social media, neural warfare, game theory, power itself, and the ways that our society has over-optimized. In particular, they talk about why it’s so important to stop trying to be right, why we need to start thinking in more complex ways, and why the real battlefield is the human mind.

This episode is brought to you by:

Better Help: Get 10% off your first month at https://betterhelp.com/impacttheory

Skillshare: Explore your creativity at skillshare.com/impacttheory for 2 free months of Premium Membership. 

SHOW NOTES:

 

Daniel was home-schooled, allowed to study whatever he thought was most important [0:30]

Daniel’s parents actually referred to his family as an “experiment” [3:40]

By the time a child goes to school, civilization has already been imprinted on them [6:04]

Daniel advocates that optimization is actually a part of the problem [8:37]

Daniel details exactly why trying to optimize leads to serious problems [13:14]

Daniel talks about how to understand civilization’s history through game theory [18:40]

Some kinds of value can be extracted and lead to power, and other kinds can’t [20:57]

Daniel uses the example of COVID-19 to illustrate the problems with optimization [25:48]

How can we think in complex ways that respect the interconnected nature of existence [30:41]

It’s much easier to break things than it is to build complex systems [35:39]

Tom and Daniel discuss whether it’s possible to nudge people in the right direction [38:16]

Social media will lead us to war even though no one wants it [46:01]

Daniel and Tom discuss the connections between high school bullying and terrorism [51:12]

If you aren’t considering counter-responses, you are just being emotionally hijacked [58:56]

People’s minds are the battlefield [1:04:17]

There are no authorities that are trustworthy enough to just assume they are right [1:09:59]

Do you want to be effective or do you want to be right? [1:15:15]

Daniel explains how people become fundamentalist about things they are wrong about [1:19:45]

Debates are often not about understanding. They are just dogfights. [1:28:48]

Legitimate power is when I am trying to influence someone to be more self-directed [1:32:03]

Tom explains the relief of focusing on finding the right answers instead of being right [1:35:35]

If you want to be right, you are very easy to control. Fragile egos are vulnerable. [1:39:55]

Capitalism, the Trump campaign and Christianity have all been antifragile so far [1:42:33]

 

FOLLOW DANIEL:

 

WEBSITE: neurohacker.com 

INSTAGRAM: https://bit.ly/2UxGUo1 

FACEBOOK: https://bit.ly/2UwYcBM 

TWITTER: https://bit.ly/37iOrvZ 

Jun 9, 2020

As tensions rise and emotions escalate, both socially and individually, it’s tough to figure out how to move forward. There are no easy answers, but that doesn’t change the fact that everyone has to confront the hard questions. Anthony Trucks, a former NFL player who was adopted into a white family as a black youth, has a unique and profound perspective on the crisis that America faces today. On this episode of Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu, Anthony Trucks shares his stories of a brutal childhood, a difficult adulthood, and a marriage that he and his wife had to rebuild after her infidelity. As he tells his own story, he offers surprising and insightful commentary on the progress America has to make, and the work each individual has to do to make that progress real.

This episode is brought you by:

Blinkist: Go to https://blinkist.com/impact to start your FREE 7 day trial AND get 25% off a Blinkist Premium Membership.

PeopleReady: Visit peopleready.com/impacttheory

SHOW NOTES:

 

Anthony explains how he remains grateful despite how hard his life has been [1:19]

Anthony describes growing up angry, dispirited and aggressive as a foster kid [3:30]

Anthony talks about how he used “dark energy” on his drive to greatness [6:34]

Tom and Anthony discuss what it means to be “bathed in discomfort” [11:18]

When someone gives you abuse and you don’t accept it, they have to walk off with it [15:33]

What is the value of emotions like anger and even rage? [19:10]

Anthony describes being able to see two sides of white America as a black man [26:08]

Anthony confronts the difficulty of white and black America understanding each other [28:28]

Anthony explains his path to recreating his marriage and forgiving his wife [35:24]

Anthony explains why he stayed in the marriage instead of finding someone new [42:27]

Anthony shares the reasons he has hope for this society [45:27]

Why you shouldn’t rob your kids of their hardships [48:21]

How do you deal with the structure of a society that was built out of oppression? [54:17]

 

QUOTES:

 

“I had 16 fights in 6th grade. I wasn’t allowed to go to summer camp because I was a flight risk.” [4:35]

 

“We’re going to have to do things we’re not used to doing in order for us to get to the place we want to get to.” [35:20]

 

“The people who made this system--they’re faceless.” [33:52]

 

FOLLOW:

 

WEBSITE: anthonytrucks.com

INSTAGRAM: https://bit.ly/3cMhNUC 

FACEBOOK: https://bit.ly/2YeBn6L 

TWITTER: https://bit.ly/3dKXicr 

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